Contact

Twitter |  @MariamVeiszadeh

Facebook |  Mariam Veiszadeh

Instagram | Mariam Veiszadeh

Email | mariam@mariamveiszadeh.com

For Speaking Engagements inquiries please email Speaking Out:

bookings@speakingout.com.au

 

 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Contact

  1. I’m really sorry u had to leave Afghanistan because of Russian invasion. I’m also really sorry about the racist tweet you got that said he wished your boat had sunk on its way to Australia. I live in Canada and if you ever come to Canada to give a speech I would like to hear it!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Mariam, keeping it brief I have just read your Media release regarding the resistance to women not being allowed to wear the Burqa or Niqab in Parliament in Australia. Well said….but it got me thinking….My question is: Why do Muslim women wear this type of clothing? What is the historical/religious relevance/meaning..I am sincerely interested in a Muslim woman’s opinion of both the reason for wearing this type of clothing and how you feel when you go out dressed in such an outfit, I am asking without prejudice. Thank You….Jenny

    Like

  3. Mariam. There is something that you need to understand. I see a recent tweet of yours that will explain it better than any other way I think.

    “A lawyer friend had been advising clients for months, when they finally met her & realised she’s a Muslim (hijab), asked for another lawyer.”

    I would too Mariam. What you need to understand is that some people don’t like to deal with other people who wear their ideology. I know for example what your religion says of non-believers and gay people. Regardless, I don’t want to know it. I don’t want to know your beliefs or be confronted with them. I would say the same if my lawyer had a “God Hates Fags” t-shirt on when he met me. It signifies intolerance and is divisive. If you wear your beliefs, expect to be confronted for them. I would say the same if my “lawyer” when I met her, was wearing a habit. Some people think that religion is a curse on the planet and don’t like religious symbols, especially worn. You are expressing your beliefs simply by walking around. I want a country where you can look at a person and not be able to tell what their beliefs are. Having said all that, I see the current situation on Twitter – don’t let it get to you.

    Like

    • I am an Australian of Italian, German and Irish descent from many years ago. I am also an Atheist and I think John, your comment is a load of crap. In my 64 years a day has never gone by when I don’t see people with the Christian cross around their neck. Or cars proudly displaying the Christian fish symbol.
      If you wish to spend your life with your head in the sand, poor fool you. I would like to see a world free of religions of all persuasions, that being said the majority of the faithful just wont to lead a peaceful life.
      Muslims have been part of Australian culture for over 200 years and been accepted as valued members of our society until very recently.
      And who cares if you don’t want a Muslim lawyer? Maybe you’ll have better luck with a Catholic, Jew or Hindu in a suit.
      And Miriam, I don’t believe in you cause but I have spent a life time defending the right for us all to be true to our beliefs as long as we harm no one in the process.

      Like

  4. I am a white Christian Australian of Anglo descent. I love Australia and its diversity. I distance myself from patriots because that term has been hijacked by Muslim haters. I similarly distance myself from the Australian Defence League. These anti Muslim groups have gathered numbers since Australia more closely aligned itself with USA and became more susceptible to the politics of fear and ignorance. They do NOT represent my views or the views of many of my friends. I will listen to well argued comments based on facts and draw my own conclusions but rants based on half truths and hearsay are not solid ground to base an argument. Islam exists in Australia and it will grow, but it is not a threat to our way of life. In fact, like most faiths, it provides solid spiritual foundation by which many would benefit if they chose to open their minds.

    Like

  5. Hello Mariam
    I just saw your story on lateline about the abuse you have received after commenting on the racist Tshirt. First of all nobody has the right to be so abusive over a difference in opinion. Secondly if it were somebody else that brought that to the attention of the public, then they would have been the target of the abuse. And thirdly that Tshirt may have some truth to it, but definitely not appropriate way to put that thought out there, and was clearly only going to cause offence and trouble. I was born in Australia with a Scottish background. I’m not a very educated women, but I see you are, and highly intelligent, and you have great bravery lady. Please please never change the way you are passionate about racism etc. I’m ashamed at how terribly some people in the community have been treating Islamic people. Someone like yourself do what is needed for people’s rights. We are all brothers and sisters and I hope with all my heart that the love and support you have received will help you realise that there are more beautiful people out there. I’m so ashamed of the hate. Stay wonderful and strong as Australia needs you for our flight for peace and respect

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s